COUNTERPOINT

Counterpoint band photo

COUNTERPOINT (from l-r): Martin “Ted” O’Neil (guitar), Ed Sutton (drums), Dom Lucock (vocals), Mikey Gaffney (bass)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

Originally from Liverpool, but now based in Manchester, alternative rock/metal four-piece Counterpoint pride themselves on crafting a hard-hitting sound that is also colossal and infectious, taking influence from the likes of While She Sleeps, letlive., and Papa Roach.

With this, as well as live performances abundant in energy, the band have amassed a steady fan base.

Recently, they have been in the studio working on their debut EP, out next February, and Dom Lucock, the outfit’s frontman, spoke to me about how that went, as well as what can be expected from the release.

How did the band form?

Almost by accident, really. Me and Ted were writing all this stuff, so we turned to the internet and contacted a 16 year-old Mexican dude called Cameron and a jazz fusion bassist named Jack.

We muddled through as best we could, but eventually, we all sort of parted ways, but Cam then put us in touch with his mate Ed, who became his replacement. He just fitted straight in, and for a while, we worked well as a three-piece.

However, we were given a decent festival slot, but we had to find a bassist. We got in touch with Mikey, who we knew from college, who was definitely a guitarist, but we were sure he owned a bass, and so, we drafted him in. After just one practise, we felt something was a bit different, and we were just like, “Mate, this is it, isn’t it?

How did the name Counterpoint come about?

We went through about 70 different names before we started getting angry with each other, and we just ended up throwing Counterpoint on our Facebook page!(laughs) I do feel, at this stage, that it really suits us.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

Basically, one of us will come in with the skeleton of a song, usually a nice riff or melody, and we will savagely tear it apart and build it up, then strip it back and build it up again, then Dan will put some reverb on it. Done.

Our song, ‘Between You And Me’, is a prime example of this, as it started off life as a slower, almost acoustic song, but now, it has a filthy breakdown.

What inspires the band lyrically?

Well, I write around 95% of the lyrics, and I do try to put together songs that are positive and uplifting, whilst drawing from bad experiences. A lot of it is mostly trying to get people to believe in themselves, and to try and not be held back by those around them, where they’re from, or even themselves.

Next February, you will be bringing out your debut EP, ‘If Not Now, When?’. How has the recording process been?

It has been amazing. We recorded at Treehouse Studios, which is a stunning gem hidden away in Sheffield. At one point we were playing Bullet For My Valentine’s snare, Fightstar’s guitars, and using the same mics that bands like While She Sleeps had used, it was all really quite inspiring.

The producers, Dan Jeffries and Jim Pinder, are insanely talented at what they do, whilst making you feel really relaxed about the whole thing at the same time.

Recording went very smoothly, except for when I was recording the vocals. At the time, I had a lung cancer scare, so I was having really serious problems breathing whilst trying to scream out the lyrics, sometimes, I could only do two words at a time, so it was quite a job!

Fortunately, everything turned out well in the end, so that’s good!

What can be expected from the release?

Not a lot, really, you should probably give it a miss! (laughs) In all seriousness, though, there are some great songs on the EP, we have literally poured everything into it. There’s some big riffs, some catchy choruses, a bit of gang vocals, all that good stuff.

How, for the band, is the experience of playing live and touring?

We’ve had a really good reception to our live show, we’re quite energised, and we like to get around the stage. We’ve just come away from playing with Crazy Town, and we’ll be going back on tour around the time our EP comes out.

What else have you got planned for early 2018?

EP launch, more touring, and new merch.

What is the band’s long-term aim?

We’re working-class northern lads, so we’re just happy that people out there want to listen to our music, listen to our experiences and also, what we have to say.

However, if 20,000 want to come down to Manchester Arena to see us, then I’m down with that, too.

Counterpoint EP Cover

‘IF NOT NOW, WHEN?’, THE DEBUT EP FROM COUNTERPOINT, WILL BE RELEASED ON FEBRUARY 9.

MORE INFO ON THIS, AND THE BAND, CAN BE FOUND HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

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MID REFLECTION

 

Mid Reflection band photo

MID REFLECTION (from l-r): Martin Velicky (guitar), David Bean (drums), Matthew “2T’z” Bishop (vocals), Nathan Neumann (bass)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

Despite having only formed almost two years ago, London four-piece Mid Reflection have made waves on their home city’s music scene.

They have played a successful run of gigs all over the UK capital, winning over crowds with a distinct, gritty sound that brings together a blend of hip-hop, ska and punk with dark, moody guitar riffs and frank, hard-hitting lyrics.

With the release of their debut EP, ‘Outcast’, imminent, the outfit’s frontman Matthew “2T’z” Bishop spoke to us about what we can expect from this, as well as going more into detail about the quartet’s origins, sound and future plans.

How did the band get together?

Nathan and Martin were jamming together a few months prior to me joining with a few different musicians. Nathan reached out to me via an ad I put up on a website and soon after that, we recruited a drummer.

About six months later, the first drummer decided he wasn’t as keen as the rest of us, so we put up another ad looking for a new drummer. Thankfully, we found David, who was actually the first to audition, and he fitted in perfectly.

We’ve had this current line up for a year, and long may it continue.

From where did the name Mid Reflection originate?

We spent months playing with different names, but not all of us could agree. I really wanted the word Reflection to be in the band name, because I feel the lyrics I write are very reflective. We needed to make it a bit more interesting that just that, though.

Eventually, someone came up with Mid, which at first was a bit strange to me, but it ultimately stuck, and we’ve had it ever since.

How did your nickname “2T’z” come about?

I was tired of being asked how to spell my real name, so I felt that alias would give people a little hint on how many T’s my name has in it (laughs).

What would you say was the band’s approach to songwriting?

I just write down the things I’ve been through. Also, I write about the constant things that run through my head, so people can understand exactly how I feel, and maybe there are people out there who can relate.

It may give them some hope that someone is going through a similar situation and isn’t scared to speak about it, giving people the courage to speak out about their feelings.

You will shortly be releasing your debut EP, ‘Outcast’. How has the recording process been?

It was pretty fun, I must say. We got the whole thing recorded in one weekend at Magpie Studios in Kent.

And what can be expected of it?

Some very real and heartfelt lyrics that many artists (especially in hip-hop) don’t do nowadays. I try to keep it as complex as I can without any room for simplicity.

In the almost two years since the band formed, you have played a run of successful shows across London and the South East. How, for you and the other band members, is the experience of performing live?

It’s nice to play our music to an audience. Hopefully soon, we can branch out to other parts of the country and build a loyal and dedicated fan base around the UK.

What are the band’s plans going into 2018?

We will try and release a few singles, as well as more music videos for people online to look at.

What is your long-term aim?

It’s hard for me to think far into the future, but all I can say is I hope that this band will reach a respectable position in the music industry and continue to make music we enjoy.

Idea-v8-print

‘OUTCAST’, THE DEBUT EP FROM MID REFLECTION, WILL BE RELEASED TOMORROW.

FURTHER INFO ON THIS, AND THE BAND, CAN BE FOUND HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

KING BEE

King Bee band photo

KING BEE (from l-r): John Townsend (drums), Ed Lamb (vocals/guitar)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

PHOTO by DOMINIC KNIGHT

From Brighton, King Bee are a two-piece that have established themselves on their home city’s music scene in the last two years, with a monstrous, unruly brand of stoner rock, full of big riffs and hard-hitting drum beats.

However, their latest release, the EP, ‘All Seeing Eye’, sees them move away a little from this, favouring a sound that is stronger and more expansive, showcasing the duo’s growth in confidence and maturity.

The band’s frontman Ed Lamb recently spoke to me in detail about how their new offering was put together, as well as their journey up to now, and what they have planned for 2018.

How did the two of you form the band?

We met through both being asked by a mutual friend in college to play in his band, which ended up being an indie band called ARC.  We sounded like a cross between the Pixies and the Vaccines or something.  It wasn’t really what we wanted to do at all. We ended up bonding and mutually decided to form a two-piece after ARC died.

From where did the name King Bee originate?

We were batting song names back and forth, and someone jokingly suggested Burger King, so we could shoot for a fast food endorsement; and from that, came King Burger, and eventually, King Bee.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

Pretty much all of it is completely off the cuff. The title track of ‘All Seeing Eye’ was written almost entirely on the spot, for instance. I was improvising riffs when John was setting up his drums, and then, he started playing over it, and the idea developed from there.

Sometimes, one of us will bring in a small riff idea, or a lyrical idea, and we’ll organically write based upon that. Our writing style is shared pretty equally.

We have a very strong mental bond when it comes to writing stuff, we’re able to freely accept and reject ideas and concepts without any boundaries, and somehow always have the same opinion and ideas on how to progress a song. It’s a symbiotic situation.

What inspires the band lyrically?

My lyric writing style is pretty odd.  Basically, we have a list of song titles which we add to. When we feel a song idea fits the vibe of a title, we’ll attach it to the tune and I’ll improvise lyrics as we jam. I write them down and expand upon them later.  I’ll then take the song name and build a lyrical concept around that.

I like fantasy and mythical beasts and stuff like that, though. The first song we wrote, ‘Brothers in Garmz’ is loosely about a Men in Black-style organisation who fight aliens. ‘Megamouth’ is about being devoured by a massive shark, ‘Cryptomaster Behemoth’ is about being devoured by uh… massive spiders.

Other songs are a bit different, though. ‘Sweat’ is about the anxieties and the feelings around performing on stage. ‘All Seeing Eye’ is about mass government surveillance.

In short, it’s basically whatever I can pull out of the air in the moment which inspires the topics.

Your third EP, ‘All Seeing Eye’, has just been released. How was the recording process?

It was very different from our previous experiences of recording. We chose Sam Thredder at the Cro’s Nest after hearing his work on some other Brighton bands (particularly our bros in Herdmover), and his pretty impressive back catalogue touching all corners of the heavy spectrum.

We’ve been used to stepping into big, expensive, comfy studios, but recording with him initially felt like a whole different kettle of fish. His room was a lot smaller and a lot more basic than anything we’d recorded in before, which kinda confused us at first.

We recorded without headphones, all live simultaneously, with all my amps blaring only feet away from the drums. Mic bleed and natural swing were embraced.

As soon as we heard the results of what he’d done, we were absolutely blown away, and we knew that this was exactly what we had been shooting for the whole time, we didn’t need no fancy-pancy overdubs or metronomes, just good solid single or double takes of us jamming our tunes in the moment.

It ended up being much more comfortable and fun than any past recording experience we’d had, and the result, in our opinion, is way thicker and more defined than we could have hoped for.

And how is the latest EP different to the band’s previous offerings?

I feel like we’ve matured much more from our previous releases, and have hit our stride. Our sound and tones are much more defined, and my singing has definitely improved massively.

I’m a lot more confident in my own voice now, and letting loose a bit, which I couldn’t do on our first EP. I can muster up a pretty decent growl or scream now, which I had no chance of doing before.

‘All Seeing Eye’ feels much more expansive, ambitious, bigger, and more cohesive than anything we’ve done before. Oh yeah, it’s also heavier and sludgier than what we’ve tried in the past. There’s always room for that!

You have established yourselves on your home city’s rock scene. How is the experience, for you both, of playing live?

There’s nothing like it for me. Writing and recording are fun, but the rush I get when I stand up on stage, hit a big chord and feel the air from John’s stupidly loud drums and my stupidly loud amps pushing me forward, is truly awesome.  When we get a good crowd response, or we see a pit start or something, it makes us super happy.

Personally, I live for playing live, and Brighton is definitely the place for it. There are lots of great venues, a good variety of bands, and lots of people looking to consume some new music.  Oh yeah, it’s also VERY sweaty.

What has the band got planned going into 2018?

Keep plugging on, playing gigs, and writing more tunes. Perhaps we’ll look at going back into the Cro’s Nest at some point next year to record some more songs.

We have Gruesome Twosomes coming up on the 20th of January at the Green Door Store in Brighton, which is an all-dayer dedicated strictly to two-pieces, that we curate.

The Green Door Store have been super accommodating of our crazy idea of a two-piece only festival and we can’t wait to play with the likes of SKiNNY MiLK, Dirty White Fever, and Frauds, who are some of our favourite bands (regardless of the number of members).

We’ll look at perhaps doing a volume 3 of that idea, if this one goes well. Other than that, it’s earning more money, so I can buy more guitar gear.

What is your long-term aim?

Record a full-length album, tour it, and live off our music. That’s the dream.

Right now, we’re looking at playing bigger and better gigs. We’re hoping to support some bigger touring bands soon and up our game, perhaps hit the festival circuit.

The world is our oyster!

‘ALL SEEING EYE’, THE LATEST EP FROM KING BEE, IS AVAILABLE NOW TO STREAM ON SPOTIFY, AND TO PURCHASE FROM THE BAND’S OFFICIAL WEBSITE kingbeeuk.com

King Bee EP Cover

FURTHER INFO ON KING BEE CAN BE FOUND THROUGH THESE SITES:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/KingBeeRocks

TWITTER: twitter.com/KingBeeBrighton

 

 

 

THE STARLING RADICALS – ‘Promiseland Vol. 1’ TRACK-BY-TRACK EXCLUSIVE

The Starling Radicals band photo

by ZAK SLOMAN

The Starling Radicals are a three-piece from Wales, comprising of vocalist/guitarist George Toulouse, bassist Gareth Bain, and drummer Joe Steele.

Having burst onto the scene three years ago with their debut album, ‘Saintland’, the band have worked hard on honing a sound that is loud, anthemic, inventive and diversely-influenced, as well as gigging extensively across the UK, playing at several universities and supporting Labrinth in Cardiff.

Prior to the release of last year’s EP, ‘Wasteland’, the trio suffered a big setback, but now, they have bounced back with a new offering, ‘Promiseland Vol. 1’, which is going to be the first half of a two-part album.

The outfit spoke exclusively to me recently, going into further detail about the four tracks.

‘I’M WITH HER’

We wanted to kick off with something representative of our stock-in-trade. Something political, something angry, something mischievous. The lyrics reference Hillary Clinton, Margaret Sanger and modern radical feminism, as well as Poe, Trump and Nietzsche.

It’s a song about the dichotomy of men’s twofold submission and dominion with regards to women, and the musical choices hopefully reflect that. The verse could almost be an ad jingle for radio, but the rest is pure filth. It’s a bit of a red pill, this one, which is why we named it after the Clinton campaign hashtag.

‘YOU MAKE A MESS OF ME’

We went vintage on much of this track, feeling the Sixties vibe is something we’ve been neglecting forever. It’s a really simple, like-it-or-don’t, little song, and the lyrics are fairly self-explanatory.

We wanted something that just oozes an attitude of dissidence, something defiant and blunt. There are traces of our inner Kinks on this track, as well as some Suede.

‘THE SCOTTISH PLAY’

A liberal eulogy to sovereignty and the fruits of national identity, for the patron saint of hill sheep farming. The lyrics compare mainstream Scottish culture with Welsh, and declare a state of loss.

This was written just before the 2014 Scottish independence referendum as an ode to the phantom Celtic republic, how annual tokens of cheap proletariat placation (through international sporting events, especially) are a Tory loyalist’s wet dream and how nations caricaturise themselves for recognition.

Musically, it’s loud, brash and bold, with lots of intricate instrumental work and twisting, churning riffs. Despite its subject, the last thing we wanted the track to be was elegiac.

‘HEART OF THIS CITY’

We like to think as this track as our Beatles moment, our ‘Shine A Light’. A song for home, wherever it may be, and the cold grey places that’ll always be ours. Plenty of melancholy in the lyrics (emphasised by the cellos), but overall, a triumphant song.

There are many layers sonically here, with strings and an armada of different guitars filling out a vast amount of space, particularly in the verses. It’s definitely a song for singing, though.

The Starling Radicals EP Cover

‘PROMISELAND VOL. 1’, THE NEW EP FROM THE STARLING RADICALS, WILL BE RELEASED THIS FRIDAY.

YOU CAN FIND OUT MORE INFO ON THIS, AND THE BAND, HERE.

 

 

 

MISCREANT

Miscreant band photo

MISCREANT (from l-r): Craig Massie (guitar), Jake Bilton (bass), Harvey Jaffrey (vocals), George Topham (drums)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

Since forming three years ago, Lincolnshire four-piece Miscreant have made waves on the British metal scene with a dark and sinister sound, taking influence from the likes of Slipknot and Sworn In.

Their debut EP, ‘Living Death’, released last year, won the band both critical acclaim and a substantial increase in followers.

At the moment, the quartet are preparing to bring out a new single, ‘Let Tomorrow Die’, which promises to their heaviest and most intense offering to date.

I spoke recently to the outfit’s frontman Harvey Jaffrey about this, as well as their origins, songwriting approach, and forthcoming set at the Techabilitation all-dayer in London.

How did the band form?

The band first started back in 2014, when I wanted to create a heavy band that had a very dark, sinister sound, so I started working on ideas with our old drummer Kieran.

Then, myself and Kieran went to work with George Christie who was able to help make our vision possible, then I got together with Massie and eventually Jake joined.

We then became an official band a year later, and then in 2016, we released our debut EP, ‘Living Death’, and then this year, we recruited George Topham on drums.

The rest, as they say, is history!

How did you come up with the name Miscreant?

I was in a previous band in which we all lived together and used to always have parties etc..

Our neighbours used to hate us, and they used to always say we were a bunch of “miscreants“, so when I started Miscreant, it just felt right, and the name has stuck to this day.

What is the band’s approach to songwriting?

We get a load of ideas down and start discussing which direction we want to go in, then, when we have the ideas of what we want, we start putting them together and then we work/record with Kieran Smith and George Christie.

They get the best out of what we have, and have been a massive part to what Miscreant is from the very start. So overall, we have an amazing team!

What would you say inspires you lyrically?

Lyrically, all of my ideas come from past experiences. Every song is a story told through a character of my own creation. The first record was about a character called Mr.M, who dealt with depression, anxiety, frustration and was very much an unstable character.

The record is about dealing with the darkest parts of your psyche, the frustration and anger of living life, hence the title ‘Living Death’.

The new single is about a much stronger character I like to call Vlad Mikaelsson, he is very much dealing with fear.. but his story is all about aggression and feeling disconnected to those around him. Two different concepts of fear for both characters. Each record that we do will be based around a different character.

Last year, the band released their debut EP, ‘Living Death’, to good reviews, and it also did well in the metal charts. How did you find the reaction to it?

It was amazing! We were really humbled to hit No.4 in the iTunes metal charts. The support we’ve had since day one has been amazing. What we have in store next will be even more exciting though..

Speaking of that, you will be bringing out a new single, ‘Let Tomorrow Die’, at the start of next month. What can be expected of it?

‘Let Tomorrow Die’ is more Miscreant than ever before. This song, to us, is a bridge to what we have in store next. Any new music after this will sound like what we’ve always wanted to be. The new single will be even more aggressive and hard hitting than anything from ‘Living Death’. 

Will the single lead to another EP or an album at all?

‘Let Tomorrow Die’ will stay as a single on its own. At this moment in time, the next record will be finished next year. Just now, we’re finishing building what we want for this next record, and we’re stoked on the ideas we have so far! Just give it a couple of months and you’ll hear a lot more about this.

The band will be playing at the Techabilitation all-dayer in London on November 26. How, for you, is the experience of playing live?

Amazing! When we perform together, we’re in a world of our own. We are very intense live. We like to think Miscreant is a show, we all love the burst of energy that we get every time we perform, and the crowd reaction makes what we do worthwhile, so the 26th is gonna be an amazing way to end the year!

What are your plans going into 2018?

We will finish our next record, and just keep playing shows. We are now booking more gigs for next year and have a few confirmed that will be announced early next year, also. Everything to come will be worth the wait, I can tell you.

Miscreant Single Cover

‘LET TOMORROW DIE’, THE NEW SINGLE FROM MISCREANT, WILL BE RELEASED ON DECEMBER 1.

FURTHER INFO ON THE BAND CAN BE FOUND THROUGH THESE SITES:

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: www.miscreantofficial.com

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/Miscreantuk

TWITTER: twitter.com/miscreantuk

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/miscreant_uk

YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com

BANDCAMP: miscreantuk.bandcamp.com

 

 

 

 

STOKE HARDCORE QUARTET OF LEGIONS ANNOUNCE DEBUT ALBUM & REVEAL NEW TRACK

Of Legions band photo

Hailing from the city where Lemmy was born and Slash grew up, hardcore posse Of Legions are a formidable, raw, crushing and passionate unit. The Stoke-on-Trent outfit take their cues from many quarters – punk, metal, rock and hardcore, and cite everyone from Black Flag, Slipknot and Parkway Drive as influences.

The four-piece unleash their debut album, ‘Face Value’, on Friday 16th February and they’ve just revealed a new track, ‘Suicidal Thoughts’.

Born in 2015 and comprising of guitarist Sam Morrey, vocalist Luke Mansfield, bassist Ollie Lewis and drummer Nath McCue, Of Legions found their sound and the right line-up around the release of their second EP, ‘Blacklisted’. The record helped to solidify the band and placed the hardcore crew on the map.

An increase in followers and a surge in support slots soon followed, as the quartet began to share stages with the likes of Gideon, Desolated, Silent Screams, Liferuiner, Martyr Defiled, TRC, Machete 187, Continents, and Brokencyde.

Of Legions kick on again with the release of their blistering new album. Fronting nine slabs of bruising hardcore-infused metal, the Potteries riff beasts’ debut full- length is a diverse offer, and one that packs a serious blow to the senses.

Look out for their new track, and also, their forthcoming video single, ‘No Loyalty’. 2018 is set to be a busy year for the rising hardcorers.

Of Legions Album Cover

‘FACE VALUE’, THE DEBUT ALBUM FROM OF LEGIONS, WILL BE RELEASED ON FEBRUARY 16.

CHECK OUT THESE SITES FOR FURTHER INFO ON THE BAND:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/OfLegions

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/of_legions_uk

YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com

BANDCAMP: oflegions-uk.bandcamp.com

 

LIGHTSCAPE

Lightscape band photo

LIGHTSCAPE (from l-r): James Nichol (drums), Ben Ashcroft (guitar), Will Overton (vocals), Sam Nichol (guitar), Christy Bullen (bass)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

The last two years have been fruitful for Norwich alternative rock quintet Lightscape.

In addition to releasing two EPs, both to overwhelmingly positive reactions, the band have been amassing a devoted following by unleashing big riffs and melodic vocals on crowds up and down the UK, while playing support slots for the likes of Lonely The Brave, Fort Hope, and The Treatment.

With a third EP, ‘Circles’, coming out next month, with a few live dates prior to its release, one of the outfit’s guitarists, Sam Nichol, spoke to me about what can be expected from the forthcoming offering, as well as the remarkable progress they have made as a band since forming in 2015.

How did the band get together initially?

Me and my brother started playing together. After changing different members and trials to get something we were happy with, we found Will via an advert. Ben, I knew from the scene from years back, but we had lost touch, and Christy went to school with Ben.

We all found each other and came together, agreeing to put everything in to this project.

From where did the name Lightscape originate?

Nothing fancy, we just reeled off a load of name, and Lightscape was the one that sounded the coolest!

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

Open-minded? You can’t force it. The initial ideas are the hardest, and they can strike at any moment. If I’m not feeling something or I can’t get any further, it’s best to stop and come back to it with fresh ears.

What inspires the band lyrically?

A lot of our lyrics stem from negative situations, but are resolved with a positive outlook, I guess that’s us trying to spread hope through our songs. They’re all personal and genuine situations too.

You released two EPs last year, one of which has been played over 9,000 times on Spotify. Are you surprised by the reaction your work has had?

Two of the songs from that EP are actually at 100,000 plays now (laughs). It’s very surreal and strange, because its just a number at the end of the day, but it means that people are enjoying our music across the world. That’s the beauty of the internet these days! We were definitely not expecting to get the level of plays we have had.

The band will be bringing out a third EP, ‘Circles’, at the start of next month. How has it been recording it?

It’s been a long process, we did half last November, then half in May with our producer Oz, so we’ve been sitting on the material for a while now.

The actual recording process is fun though, I mean you sit in one room all day, but you get to be creative and listen to the songs take shape in a much bigger format than you could ever achieve at home!

What can be expected of the forthcoming release?

We carefully crafted these six tracks, and we struggled so hard which to pick for a single, as in our eyes, they all could be singles! There are massive choruses (which seems to be a trademark of our sound), big riffs, atmospheric and ambient sections, all of which hopefully link together for the listener and takes them on a journey.

The EP mainly looks at themes of hope and unity, whilst we struggle with the ever-changing world we live in.

You’re playing a few live sets this month, including a support slot for As Lions. How, for you, is the experience of playing live?

Live is why most of us are in a band, we really enjoy what we do, and the chance to showcase that to brand new crowds up and down the country is so much fun, especially when people are blown away and full of compliments, it’s such a gratifying moment.

What has the band got lined up for 2018?

At the moment, we’re planning on doing more dates out of our home city, playing up and down the country, meeting new people, and spreading organically as much as possible!

We have had a brilliant year full of awesome opportunities, what with going abroad to Austria to support Black Stone Cherry etc. Hopefully, we can do similar things next year!

Lightscape EP Cover

‘CIRCLES’, THE THIRD EP FROM LIGHTSCAPE, WILL BE RELEASED ON DECEMBER 1. YOU CAN PRE-ORDER IT NOW AT THE BAND’S OFFICIAL WEBSITE www.lightscapeofficial.co.uk

FURTHER INFO ON THE BAND CAN BE FOUND THROUGH THESE SITES:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/lightscape.band

TWITTER: twitter.com/Lightscape_UK

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/lightscape_uk

YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com

BANDCAMP: lightscapeuk.bandcamp.com

SOUNDCLOUD: soundcloud.com/lightscapeuk