PRECIBUS

Precibus band photo

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

Having started out as an instrumental outfit, Staffordshire five-piece Precibus’s sound has evolved over the years into what is now a complex combination of alternative and progressive metal.

The band have become highly-regarded on their local scene, and despite missing out on a place at Bloodstock this summer, as well as having to change their line-up, they are looking to the future with much optimism.

I recently chatted with bassist Jacek and drummer Pawel prior to the quintet’s recent set at Chords Against Cancer in Uttoxeter, and this is what they both had to say:

How did the band get together?

PAWEL (drums): We met through a website looking for band members, because me and Mariusz, the guitarist, had played together in a band back in Poland, and in around 2009, we both started to think about putting a new band together. First, we looked for a bass player, Jacek came along, and the three of us started jamming together.

JACEK (bass): Was the website Join My Band?

PAWEL: Join My Band, yes. After three years of being a trio, playing mainly instrumental stuff, we recruited a second guitarist/vocalist, and then in 2013, we got a lead vocalist in, and that was when we really started to play the songs we do now.

How did the name Precibus come about?

PAWEL: It’s a funny story, as my missus actually proposed the name, and it came from one of her favourite songs from one of her favourite bands. I then proposed the name to the others, they liked the sound of it, and we started calling ourselves Precibus from there.

What are the band’s main musical influences?

PAWEL: We all like quite a wide range of music, but I think our main influences are Soundgarden, Tool, Faith No More, also progressive rock.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

PAWEL: Usually, someone will come up with an idea, we then work around that, most of the time, we will work together on the idea, and eventually turn it into a song, but sometimes, one or two of the band members will work on the majority of a song.

What inspires the band lyrically?

PAWEL: Well, you would have to talk to our old vocalist about that, as he tended to write most of the lyrics.

JACEK: We recently brought in a new lead vocalist, Jaro, and so far, he’s just been performing the songs that were written prior to him coming in, but I think with our old vocalist, the lyrics had much to do with their personal experiences.

What are the band’s main musical influences?

PAWEL: We all like quite a wide range of music, but I think our main influences are Soundgarden, Tool, Faith No More, also progressive rock.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

PAWEL: Usually, someone will come up with an idea, we then work around that, most of the time, we will work together on the idea, and eventually turn it into a song, but sometimes, one or two of the band members will work on the majority of a song.

What inspires the band lyrically?

PAWEL: Well, you would have to talk to our old vocalist about that, as he tended to write most of the lyrics.

JACEK: We recently brought in a new lead vocalist, Jaro, and so far, he’s just been performing the songs that were written prior to him coming in, but I think with our old vocalist, the lyrics had much to do with their personal experiences.

So far, you have released two EPs, 2014 debut ‘Madness’, and 2016 follow-up ‘Control’. How were the reactions to them when they first came out?

PAWEL: I think it was mainly positive. The two EPs were completely different records, you could say, a variety of different songs and musical styles. ‘Control’ was much more complex, and a better indicator of where we’re heading as a band now.

Earlier this year, the band got to the final of Nottingham Metal 2 The Masses, where the winner got the chance to play at the Bloodstock festival. How was that as an experience?

PAWEL: That was good, but at the time, our old lead vocalist and second guitarist had both said they were leaving, but had agreed to carry on until the end of the competition, so we were going through a transitional phase, as we still had the old line-up for our live performances, but at the same time, we were rehearsing with the new guys.

How did you do in the final?

PAWEL: Unfortunately, we lost to another band called Underdog.

I can imagine it was a disappointment missing out on playing Bloodstock, then.

JACEK: Yes, because we got so close, but we’ll try again next year.

PAWEL: Probably a different area, though, such as Staffordshire, because in Nottingham, we were up against so many good bands, all playing to a very high level.

How is it overall, for the band, performing live?

PAWEL: It’s great fun, and it’s what we set out to do, above all else.

JACEK: And it’s good to see how our songs have been so welcomed by the crowds we’ve played to.

PAWEL: As I said earlier, we take much inspiration from progressive rock, so there are some complex rhythms in our live sound, but that’s what we like.

And finally, what are your plans for the near future?

PAWEL: We have a new line-up now, so soon, we’re going to start writing some new songs, and hopefully next year, we will be able to release some new stuff.

FURTHER INFO ON PRECIBUS CAN BE FOUND THROUGH THE FOLLOWING SITES:

FACEBOOK

BANDCAMP

YOUTUBE

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s