MANCHESTER RIFF TYRANTS PEUR ANNOUNCE NEW SINGLE AND TOUR

Peur band photo

Hitting your senses with a sound that fuses the edgy dexterity of Nine Inch Nails with the hook-laden know-how of Biffy Clyro, Peur are a band that you must hear.

Ferociously impressive and massive in sound, the Manchester-based trio deliver bold, roaring alt-rock that’s as melodic as it is heavy. Formed at the start of 2013,
members Joe Lomax (vocals/guitar), Ryan Greenhalgh (bass) and Sam Tempest
(drums) bring an enthralling and unique vision of music, striking a balance between heavy instruments and the very best elements of hard and alternative rock sounds.

With influences ranging from Muse and 65daysofstatic to Northlane, their broad taste allows them to write music with complexity and mainstream appeal.

To date, the band have supported a host of artists panning from the DZ Deathrays, Allusondrugs, and Dearly Beloved, to Empty Yard Experiment, and have also received prominent coverage from independent, commercial FM and Internet radio shows, including BBC Radio 1 and 6 Music.

2015 was a successful year for the industrious trio, as their widely received sophomore EP, ‘Future Architects’, brought the alt-rockers much national attention and also earned them a slot at T In The Park. The band then spent the vast majority of 2016 penning tracks for their debut album, which lands later this year.

Before this, Peur mark their return with the release of a new single, which has been produced by long term collaborator Dan Weller (Enter Shikari, Young Guns), entitled, ‘An Exercise in Abstinence’. The single is a dynamic slab of captivating alt-rock laced with alluring phrasing that is destined to ignite.

The band will also be touring throughout October; see below for dates:

Saturday 14th – London The Lock Tavern, Tuesday 17th – Hull The Sesh, Thursday 19th – Leeds Chapel, Friday 20th – Huddersfield Parish, Saturday 21st – Newcastle Trillians.

‘AN EXERCISE IN ABSTINENCE’, THE NEW SINGLE FROM PEUR, WILL BE RELEASED ON OCTOBER 13.

KEEP UP TO DATE WITH THE BAND VIA THEIR SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/PeurOfficial

TWITTER: twitter.com/peurofficial

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/peur.space

 

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CASSIA

Cassia band photo

CASSIA (from l-r): Jake Leff (drums), Rob Ellis (vocals/guitar), Lou Cotterill (bass)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

PHOTO by CAMILLA JORDAN

For young Cheshire three-piece Cassia, 2017 has so far been very fruitful.

The band have burst onto the emerging music scene with an infectious feel-good sound that has been described as “calypso afro-rock”, resulting in them being championed by BBC Introducing, and attracting a sizable, and growing, following on social media.

The Macclesfield trio had a busy August Bank Holiday weekend, playing at Reading and Leeds, releasing a new single, and kicking it off by playing an intimate headline set in Hanley, where I spoke to them.

How did the band get together?

LOU COTTERILL (bass): Myself and Rob, we were doing little bits in a studio, just trying to make music, really. We’d both just come out of school, and we wanted to start gigging.

However, our sound wasn’t working with just the two of us, so we went on a quest for a drummer. We found Jake in a Wetherspoon’s, with the help of my girlfriend Camilla. She introduced us to each other, and we actually said to him: “Do you know any drummers?“, because we thought he was going to be too busy or whatever.

He asked us if he could give it a go at all, and it all went from there. We haven’t looked back since.

How did the name Cassia come about?

LOU: It was just a word, really, with not much meaning behind it, when we first plucked it out of the air. We were just trying to find stuff that could go hand-in-hand with our sound. I think cassia is a tropical word for cinnamon or bark, from a tropical tree or something.

JAKE: Interestingly enough, about a year down the line, we found a djembe drum, and it has definitely changed what I have been doing with the drums and stuff. The djembe is actually made out of cassia wood, so that was quite cool. I thought to myself at the time: “It was meant to be!

You define your sound as “calypso afro-rock“. For those who have no idea, what is that exactly?

JAKE: Feel-good dancing music, I reckon. Lots of percussion.

LOU: Plenty of rhythm.

JAKE: I don’t really know how to explain it, if someone doesn’t know what it is.

LOU: Happy rhythms and melodies. Not many minor chords in there.

JAKE: How would you describe it, Rob?

ROB: Well, I suppose it’s a culmination of ideas. I don’t know, it’s just a phrase we use to describe ourselves.

JAKE: I think it was actually our manager who came up with that.

Which bands/artists are you all influenced by the most?

LOU (quietly): We all like Vampire Weekend. (All laugh) We say that all the time. We do like a bit of Paul Simon…

ROB: The Police?

JAKE: Yeah, them.

ROB: I dunno. It sort of depends, really, on what we’re listening to at the time.

JAKE: The Beach Boys, they’re pretty cool.

ROB: Everyone’s got a nice thing going on, haven’t they?

LOU: Yeah, it’s all about piecing it all together, something that’s a bit different.

ROB: We’ve got a bit of Paul Simon in there, not too much, though, because no-one likes that.

LOU: You also can’t have too much Vampire Weekend.

JAKE: Yeah, it fucking does your head in, doesn’t it?

LOU: Yeah, just some African vibes mixed in with some accessible sounds.

JAKE: An accessible twist!

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

JAKE: We play together for three hours and pray! (All laugh)

ROB: As of recent, yeah. It’s pretty much that, isn’t it?

JAKE: Our songs usually come with a staple idea, some core ingredients, and that can come in the form of anything, really. We then just jam around it.

LOU: Rob will come in and go: “I’ve got the riffs!

JAKE: Big, fatty riffs.

LOU: We then add some grooves.

JAKE: There’s also a cheeky harmony thrown in there, and we’re good to go.

ROB: It’s hard, though. You can get a good idea, but then it can become a terrible song. It’s about turning a good idea into a good song. We do have a lot of stuff on the go, we always have a lot of tunes, but it just gets narrowed down to a couple.

JAKE: We usually something called ‘The Morning After Test’, where it’s like: “Fucking yeah, this song is sick!“, but then we will listen to it the next morning, and we will go: “What the fuck is this?

ROB: Normally, that can be because of extreme fatigue, which can cloud our judgement somewhat. That tends to happen sometimes.

What inspires the band lyrically?

ROB: I don’t know, really. We’ve actually never been asked this before. It’s just kind of happy stuff, to be honest. It’s like, all of that first person based stuff, not as if it’s about me, but about someone else or something like that.

The way we’re playing now, the way we write, it’s kind of easier to come up with stuff while you’re making sounds and things, and you try and form it all into lyrics, whereas we used to spend quite a bit of time writing them, now, we just change them as we go along.

LOU: Writing and changing.

ROB: Yeah.

2017 has so far been a remarkable year for the band. One of your singles, ‘100 Times Over’, received airplay on BBC Radio 1, there’s been an European tour, as well as numerous festivals played. How have you been dealing with all that? You must be pinching yourselves.

JAKE: It’s been ridiculous.

LOU: It’s been crazy.

JAKE: Luckily, where we come from, no-one really gives a shit, so that’s kept us grounded.

ROB: It’s been good.

JAKE: It’s awesome to be able to play music with your friends, and to get to travel as well. I mean, Germany, I’d never been before we played there, that was cool.

You haven’t quite got to the stage yet where you are all making ludicrous demands, then?

(All laugh)

JAKE: No, we could never do that, could we? We were lucky to do this Apple Music thing recently, and there was an artist, I won’t say who it is, let’s just say they’re bigger than us, and apparently, they were demanding Nando’s to be brought to their dressing room.

LOU: I don’t think we’ll ever get like that, to be honest. It doesn’t feel like we have moved forward, even though a lot of things have happened or are happening. We’re still at that stage where we practice in a shitty little practice room on Mondays. I guess that’s kept us grounded as well.

ROB: I like that, though, because we would be sort of kidding ourselves if we got all this fancy gear and stuff. It’s good to come back to a place where it all started.

LOU: It’s just happy days, innit?

You’re headlining here in Hanley tonight, but this weekend, you are going to be playing Reading and Leeds. How are you feeling towards that? Excited? Nervous?

LOU: We’re really excited, actually.

JAKE: Fucking buzzing!

ROB: I’m really, really nervous. (laughs) No, actually, I’m fine. I think it will be a good laugh.

LOU: I think this will be our last festival set of the summer. The ones we have been playing have all been building up to this, this will be the big one, so we’re excited, but there’s some nerves as well.

JAKE: I haven’t taken it in yet. I still can’t really think about it, to be honest.

ROB: It was good when we got our guest passes delivered to us the other day, all access areas and that. We would like to use them to meet Eminem, maybe have a coffee with him.

You’re also going to be on tour in October to promote your forthcoming EP, ‘Movers & Shapers’. How is the experience of playing live and touring?

ROB: It’s tiring, but I like it. There’s a lot of waiting around, you have to get used to that, and the driving to and from the venues is pretty intense.

JAKE: Lou’s the band driver, but this weekend will be the first time he doesn’t have to drive all of us around.

ROB: Last week, we played Nottingham and London, and I think in between, we only got two hours sleep. It gave me a gum infection!

(Lou and Jake laugh)

LOU: Yeah, Rob sent me a text saying: “I can’t come to practice today, I’ve got to go to the dentist’s instead.” We’re not quite rock n’ roll yet.

I have to say the live stuff is the most exciting thing about being in a band.

ROB: Yeah, definitely.

LOU: For me, there’s no better feeling than playing to a venue full of people singing along to the songs you have written.

When will the EP be released?

JAKE: It will probably be in the next few months.

ROB: More like over the next ten years.

JAKE: Our new single, ‘Sink’, has just come out.

ROB: Yeah, we’re planning to do a few versions of that track, along with other stuff. That will be quite cool, I reckon. There’s going to be a lot of releases for the rest of this year.

What is the band’s long-term aim?

ROB: We’re well on our way to Wembley, I’d say.

JAKE: To be fair, any band that says they don’t want to play a stadium are lying. If we could get to play somewhere like Wembley or the Castlefield Bowl, that would be great. We would have done pretty well.

‘SINK’, CASSIA’S NEW SINGLE, IS NOW AVAILABLE TO LISTEN TO ON SPOTIFY & APPLE MUSIC, AND TO BUY ON iTunes.

THE BAND WILL ALSO BE GOING ON TOUR IN OCTOBER. FURTHER DETAILS BELOW:

Cassia tour poster

MORE INFO ON THE BAND CAN BE FOUND AT THESE SITES:

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: www.wearecassia.com

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/wearecassia

TWITTER: twitter.com/wearecassia

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/wearecassia

 

 

 

 

MACMILLAN FEST 2017 PREVIEW

Macmillan Fest 2017 poster

by ZAK SLOMAN

Next Saturday, the centre of Nottingham’s rock scene will be taken over by the Macmillan Fest, an all-day festival which is now in its eighth year.

It promises to be bigger and better than before, with over 60 bands and artists, including The Treatment and Hacktivist, confirmed, playing across seven stages, all to raise awareness and money for Macmillan Cancer Support.

One of the many people working very hard to make sure everything will run smoothly, and confident of adding to the £21,000 raised since 2010, is one of the festival’s founders, Kris Davis, who went into more detail about what will surely be a fantastic day.

How did you first come up with the idea for Macmillan Fest?

When I was 16 years old, my tutor at the time was diagnosed with a brain tumour. At that time, my classmates and myself were cretins. I’m not sure how he dealt with us! After discovering his diagnosis, I felt quite bad, and heard that Macmillan Cancer Support had helped him.

Being in a band playing drums at the time and starting to find my love for live music already, myself and a friend thought it’d be great to do a benefit gig to raise money for Macmillan as a way of saying thank you. After that year, it went down so well, I thought i’d make it a regular thing.

The year after, I did Macmillan Fest in a pub called The Central. After that, we moved to our current home of Rock City & Rescue Rooms, where we have had the pleasure of helping hundreds / thousands of people pay their gratitude to Macmillan and the work they do.

It’s the people’s stories and experiences that makes us continue this festival and wanting to better it year on year.

When did you start planning for this year’s festival?

Around last December / January. For next year, however, I have already had a couple of artists confirmed.

Which bands/artists playing are you personally looking forward to seeing?

After the hype surrounding them, I am personally looking forward to seeing Hacktivist, especially after coming off two dates with Korn in London!

Others I’m looking forward to seeing are: Black Ink, The Dandylions, Anticlone, Holding Absence, Wearing Scars and Anavae!

Music isn’t the only thing going on at the festival this year. Tell me about the other stuff that’s happening.

We have head shaves taking place, photo booths, free drinks (but go visit our kind sponsors in Fireball sooner rather than later), waxing of all areas of the body (depending on how drunk you are) and some great quality food stalls!

Will you be looking at putting on Macmillan Fests in more cities in the future?

We currently run another Macmillan Fest at the awesome Thekla in Bristol (it’s essentially a boat party!) We would love to run it elsewhere in the UK in the future, but only when the time is right.

MACMILLAN FEST 2017, IN AID OF MACMILLAN CANCER SUPPORT, WILL BE TAKING PLACE IN NOTTINGHAM CITY CENTRE ON SEPTEMBER 2.

TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE, PRICED AT £16.80, AND YOU CAN GET THEM NOW FROM www.alttickets.com/macmillan-fest-2017-tickets AS WELL AS OTHER TICKET SITES.

KEEP UP TO DATE WITH THE LATEST NEWS ON THE FESTIVAL BY GOING TO THESE SITES:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/MacmillanFest

TWITTER: twitter.com/MacmillanFest

YOU CAN ALSO DONATE TO MACMILLAN CANCER SUPPORT AT: www.macmillan.org.uk

 

 

 

 

BEYOND ATLANTIS

Beyond Atlantis band photo

BEYOND ATLANTIS (from l-r): Steven “Herbie” Herbert (guitar), Manny Jack(vocals/guitar)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

Beyond Atlantis is a new musical collaboration between Steven “Herbie” Herbert, the drummer from rising rock quartet Anonymous, and singer-songwriter Manny Jack.

The talented duo, hailing from the Midlands, have a gentle acoustic sound, taking influence from late 90’s, early 00’s alternative rock, coupled with uncomplicated lyrics, and soft, melodic vocals with a slight gritty edge.

Having just released their debut single, ‘Songbird’, the fledgling two-piece told me more about themselves and their future plans.

How was Beyond Atlantis formed?

STEVEN “HERBIE” HERBERT (guitar): I guess you could say Beyond Atlantis began when Manny & me formed a band called Endeavour in high school around six years ago, as that was the starting point of our writing teamwork.

MANNY JACK (vocals/guitar): About a year or so ago, we jammed and from there on, we decided that we would continue and see where we could go. I have played with many musicians over time, but the musical bond of being able to create a new song off the bat is a normal day in this duo, BA needed to be done.

How did the name come about?

MANNY: It came down to a lot of thought and elimination, but we wanted something to stand out. Herbie originally came up with the name.

HERBIE: Yeah, I was looking at some band names I liked and was trying to figure out what made them so good and memorable. I think I’d just finished playing Bioshock and the underwater city idea kept coming up. So I came up with the name and ran it past Manny.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

HERBIE: It varies. Sometimes we bring a skeleton of a song to the table or a simple idea, like a riff or melody, and work off of each other’s ideas from there. Other times, we have all the song written and show it to the other, in which they add their parts or change bits here and there.

What inspires you both lyrically?

MANNY: I have always wrote lyrics even before I could sing, but personally, I believe when I write it’s what comes from my head and heart. I am inspired by my thoughts mainly but with Herbie, we join ideas.

HERBIE: I write lyrics about what’s going on in the world or my life at that given time. A lot of the time, it’s getting my opinions across through song. I do try to make them generic sounding as I feel that that’s more relatable. As of late, I’ve tried writing outside of what I’m used to and just experimenting.

Herbie, you’re also the drummer in Anonymous. How is it different playing in an acoustic duo to playing in a rock four-piece?

HERBIE: It’s more of a challenge for me personally as I can’t help but see myself as a ‘drummer’. Having said that, I feel like picking up a guitar or bass has really helped me expand as a musician, it’s just more nerve-racking getting out in front of people playing guitar as I feel that drums are my comfort zone.

The major difference between the two is that there are less people to clash with. It’s very organic with Manny as we meet in the middle with ideas or expand on whatever the other has brought to the table. There are pros and cons to both, but it’s a totally different environment and has been refreshing for me.

Having now released your debut single, are you planning on bringing out an EP or album at all in the near future?

MANNY: Yes, we have been working hard on our first full-length album this year, which will feature ‘Songbird’. This album has a multi-genre feel that consists of a double-digit play list. All of the songs were written and produced by the both of us with a lot of heart and hard work, we hope you guys will give us a listen.

All updates on the release of our album will be distributed on all of our social media, so stay on board for news and promotions.

Is Beyond Atlantis going to be just a short-term project or is it going to be something more long-term?

HERBIE: It’s a long-term thing for sure.

MANNY: We have so many ideas and a lot of material for everyone to enjoy. Long-term is a guarantee.

Beyond Atlantis Single Cover

‘SONGBIRD’, BEYOND ATLANTIS’S DEBUT SINGLE, IS NOW AVAILABLE TO LISTEN TO ON THE BAND’S SOUNDCLOUD PAGE soundcloud.com/beyond-atlantis

YOU CAN ALSO CHECK OUT OUR REVIEW OF THE SINGLE HERE

KEEP UP TO DATE WITH BEYOND ATLANTIS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AT:

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/BeyondAtlantisOfficial

TWITTER: twitter.com/Beyond_Atlantis

REVERBNATION: www.reverbnation.com/beyondatlantis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SHADED REVEAL NEW VIDEO AND ANNOUNCE UK TOUR DATES

Shaded band photo

Yesterday, pop-punk quartet SHADED revealed their new video for single release ‘Better With You’. The single is taken from their forthcoming EP, ‘The Better Man In Me’, that is released on the 1st September.

The video was revealed with Upset magazine, who also announced the forthcoming UK tour dates.

We’re so excited to finally be able to show people what we’ve been up to,” explain the band. “We worked with our good friend Zak Pinchin on the video for our single ‘Better With You’ and we couldn’t be happier with the outcome. The single and video are a result of a lot of hard work, so we just hope people can relate to it and enjoy it!

YOU CAN NOW VIEW THE VIDEO FOR ‘BETTER THAN YOU’ AT www.youtube.com

SHADED WILL BE GOING ON TOUR NEXT MONTH. FURTHER DETAILS ARE BELOW.

Shaded tour poster

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT OUR RECENT INTERVIEW WITH THE BAND HERE

 

 

 

HIGH WIRE

High Wire band photo

HIGH WIRE (from front left): Mark Nussle (guitar), Chris Rymer (guitar), Adam Harrington (drums), Cameron Jones (vocals/bass)

INTERVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

In recent years, the Windy City of Chicago has established itself as a hotbed of emerging pop-punk talent, with many hoping to emulate the successes enjoyed by locally originated bands such as Fall Out Boy and Alkaline Trio.

One such outfit already on their way to achieving this are High Wire, a four-piece hailing from Iowa and Australia who have firmly established themselves on the city’s rock scene, gaining a dedicated fan base in the process.

Currently touring the American Midwest promoting forthcoming EP ‘Different Places’, vocalist/bassist Cameron Jones told me about the band’s journey so far, and what the future has in store for them.

How did the band initially get together?

Mark, Chris, and I all grew up in the same small town in Iowa. Mark and I started playing together when we around thirteen and Chris joined up with us in high school. We jammed together in different groups throughout our time at school, and after we all graduated, we knew that this was something that we wanted to continue.

We decided to move to Chicago because it had a great music scene and it was close to home for us. We spent a couple of years with different vocalists and drummers in the line-up, we even played for a stretch with a Macbook drumming for us live.

Luckily, Adam eventually saw a Craigslist posting we made searching for a drummer and we hit it off immediately. Shortly after Adam joined, Mark and I took over on lead vocals and we’ve been playing together ever since.

How did the name High Wire come about?

It was actually a name that a previous drummer had come up with. It came from a Roger Ebert quote that was on a movie poster hanging in our living room. We ended up shortening the name a while back, but it’s still the same origin story.

How would you describe your sound?

It’s the marriage of current Chicago pop-punk and the alternative albums of the early 2000’s we grew up with.

What are the band’s main musical influences?

Blink 182, New Found Glory, The Starting Line, Fall Out Boy, The Dangerous Summer. There are so many, it’s hard to only pick a few. Basically anything that was on Drive Thru Records.

What would you say was your approach to songwriting?

It starts with Mark and I laying in guitar parts. We have a makeshift studio to do basic recordings in. We play through options, typically parts that we feel will become the chorus, humming or softly singing melody ideas in.

We try to get a few pieces of a song or a good hook before we jam through it together as a band, and then we’ll collaborate instrumentally and lyrically to finish the song together.

What inspires the band lyrically?

Really, it can be anything from day-to-day life. It will depend on the feel of the song instrumentally and connecting that vibe to a real life experience. Songwriting can be a great therapeutic way to express yourself and work through something, so they tend to be extreme highs or lows.

Next month, you will be releasing a new EP, ‘Different Places’. How has the recording process been?

It’s been great. This was our second time recording with Seth Henderson at ABG and we couldn’t be happier. We were familiar with his process and vibe going in, so we really hit the ground running with this recording.

Apart from him having a great ear and awesome ideas while producing this EP, he’s just an awesome dude to hang out with all day. We can’t wait to go back.

What can be expected from the EP?

It’s similar to our previous release, ‘Caught Up In Everything’, but elevated to a stronger, more mature sound. It has the current pop-punk sound you know and the early 2000’s alternative sound you remember.

You’re currently on tour across the American Midwest. How is the experience of playing live and touring for you all?

It’s why we do this. Writing and recording is great, but playing live with your friends is the most fun. It’s like being on a road trip with your friends and the highlight of every night is playing a live show.

There can be challenges with being away from home, but in the end, playing our music and interacting with the crowd makes all of the challenges well worth it.

What is the band’s long-term aim?

We want to continue to play and write music that both the fans and us enjoy listening to, and we want to play in as many new places and in front of as many different crowds as we can.

High Wire Cover

‘DIFFERENT PLACES’, THE NEW EP FROM HIGH WIRE, WILL BE RELEASED ON SEPTEMBER 8.

FURTHER INFO ON THE BAND CAN BE FOUND AT THESE SITES:

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: highwireil.com

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/HighWireIL

TWITTER: twitter.com/highwireil

 

BEYOND ATLANTIS – ‘Songbird (As Seasons Come & Go)’

Beyond Atlantis Single Cover

REVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

‘Songbird (As Seasons Come & Go)’ is the debut single from Midlands acoustic duo Beyond Atlantis, made up of singer-songwriter Manny Jack and Steven “Herbie” Herbert, the drummer from rock four-piece Anonymous.

As far as debuts go, the track is strong, with the sound, inspired by late 90’s, early 00’s alternative rock, following a formula of gentle guitar strums, which increase in intensity as the song moves forwards towards the chorus, coupled with an underlying marching band-style drum beat, and uncomplicated lyrics, which are easy to remember and sing along to.

This is all held together well with Manny’s vocal delivery, which is soft and melodic, but with a subtle gritty edge, and hits both the higher and lower notes with ease.

Having become familiar with Herbie’s work with Anonymous these last couple of years, becoming a part of Beyond Atlantis has given him the chance to show how versatile he is musically, with him being just at home with the smooth, genial tones of this track, as the heavier, jagged fare he is more used to playing.

‘Songbird’ is a strong debut track from two talented musicians, and I look forward to seeing where they go from here.

(3/5)