MALTHOUSE – The Exchange, Hanley, 04/03/2017

SUPPORT: The Red Kites, Tom Lockett, Rachel Ferguson

Malthouse review photo

REVIEW by ZAK SLOMAN

The Exchange is a place that has firmly established itself as a key venue on the Stoke-on-Trent music scene in recent years, and it had a great opportunity to show exactly why with a Saturday evening playing host to a mix of local musical talent.

Headlining were modern soul/blues trio Malthouse, who were there to give everyone a sneak preview of their forthcoming EP ‘Extracts Of The Soul’.

Kicking things off was singer-songwriter Rachel Ferguson, a relative newcomer to the Potteries. Despite a sparse crowd, she impressed those that were there, playing a set that consisted of her gently strumming a guitar to a sound that fused together elements of folk, alternative and lounge, coupled with a vocal delivery reminiscent of Lana Del Rey.

Next up was another Stoke singer-songwriter, Tom Lockett, who already enjoys a good local reputation. He proved this, channelling his inner Bob Dylan (complete with harmonica!) with a strong performance, mixing intelligent lyrics with a sound that was a combination of folk, jazz, blues and Sixties psychedelia. After seeing Tom, it is clear that a bright future lies ahead for him.

By the time last support The Red Kites took to the stage, the venue had started to fill up nicely, and the people who had just turned up were in for a treat. The outfit played a quality set, utilising a diverse range of musical genres to create a sound that was eclectic and a good listen.

There was much anticipation in the run-up to Malthouse’s headline set, with the now capacity crowd eager to see if their forthcoming release, which they were playing for the first time live, could top their well-received debut EP ‘Staveley Sessions’.

Judging by what I saw of them, it is safe to say that they have done exactly this. The new tracks they performed showcased how they have matured and developed, and I could also definitely get the feeling of abundant passion from them, which was present in the way they played their music. The audience seemed to agree, giving a universal positive response, which shows much promise for the recorded version, which will be out soon.

Yet again, going to a live gig in Stoke-on-Trent has proved to me that the local scene is currently one of the best-kept secrets in British music, and if the city is chosen later this year to succeed Hull as the UK’s City of Culture, then the rest of the country will get to find out just how rich and diverse it truly is.

 

 

 

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